Saturday, June 25, 2022

The Central Arawaks

Farabee, William Curtis, The Central Arawaks, Philadelphia: The University Museum, 1918. (in very bad shape – falling apart)

Available online:

From the Preface:
The material presented in the following pages was collected during the first year of field work of the University Museum's South American Expedition, 1913-1916. The work was done under the supervision of Dr. G. B. Gordon, Director of the Museum, and with the assistance in the field of Dr. Franklin H. Church, Sr. Joaquin Albuquerque and Mr. John Ogilvie.

Friday, June 17, 2022

The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 6 – Physical Anthropology, Linguistics and Cultural Geography of South American Indians

Steward, Julian H., The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 6 – Physical Anthropology, Linguistics and Cultural Geography of South American Indians, Washington: Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology, 1950.

Sections:

1. Ancient Man
2. Physical Anthropology
3. The languages of South American Indians
4. Geography and Plant and Animal Resources.


The Handbook of South American Indians is a monographic series of edited scholarly and reference volumes in ethnographic studies, published by the Smithsonian Institution between 1940 and 1947.[1] In 1932, Baron Erland Nordenskiöld agreed to edit the series for the National Research Council Division of Anthropology and Psychology; however, he died that year. The Smithsonian Institution agreed to sponsor the series but adequate funds were not approved by US Congress until 1940. Julian Steward edited the series. Ultimately, over a hundred scholars from Latin America, the United States, and Europe contributed and provided advice for the series.[1] This six-volume series, with an additional index volume, documents information about Indigenous peoples of South America, including cultural and physical aspects of the people, language family, history, and prehistory. This is a reference work for historians, anthropologists, other scholars, and the general reader. The series utilizes noted authorities for each topic. The set is illustrated, indexed, and has extensive bibliographies.

The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 5 – The Comparative Ethnology of South American Indians

Steward, Julian H., The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 5 – The Comparative Ethnology of South American Indians, Washington: Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology, 1949.

Sections:

1. A Cross-Cultural Survey of South American Indian Tribes
2. Jesuit Missions in South America
3. The Native Populations of South America
4. South American Cultures: An Interpretative Summary.


The Handbook of South American Indians is a monographic series of edited scholarly and reference volumes in ethnographic studies, published by the Smithsonian Institution between 1940 and 1947.[1] In 1932, Baron Erland Nordenskiöld agreed to edit the series for the National Research Council Division of Anthropology and Psychology; however, he died that year. The Smithsonian Institution agreed to sponsor the series but adequate funds were not approved by US Congress until 1940. Julian Steward edited the series. Ultimately, over a hundred scholars from Latin America, the United States, and Europe contributed and provided advice for the series.[1] This six-volume series, with an additional index volume, documents information about Indigenous peoples of South America, including cultural and physical aspects of the people, language family, history, and prehistory. This is a reference work for historians, anthropologists, other scholars, and the general reader. The series utilizes noted authorities for each topic. The set is illustrated, indexed, and has extensive bibliographies.

The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 4 – The Circum-Caribbean Tribes

Steward, Julian H., The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 4 – The Circum-Caribbean Tribes, Washington: Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology, 1948.

Sections:

1. Central American Cultures
2. The Cultures of Northwest South America
3. The West Indies.


The Handbook of South American Indians is a monographic series of edited scholarly and reference volumes in ethnographic studies, published by the Smithsonian Institution between 1940 and 1947.[1] In 1932, Baron Erland Nordenskiöld agreed to edit the series for the National Research Council Division of Anthropology and Psychology; however, he died that year. The Smithsonian Institution agreed to sponsor the series but adequate funds were not approved by US Congress until 1940. Julian Steward edited the series. Ultimately, over a hundred scholars from Latin America, the United States, and Europe contributed and provided advice for the series.[1] This six-volume series, with an additional index volume, documents information about Indigenous peoples of South America, including cultural and physical aspects of the people, language family, history, and prehistory. This is a reference work for historians, anthropologists, other scholars, and the general reader. The series utilizes noted authorities for each topic. The set is illustrated, indexed, and has extensive bibliographies.

Sunday, June 12, 2022

The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 3 – The Tropical Forest Tribes

Steward, Julian H., The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 3 – The Tropical Forest Tribes, Washington: Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology, 1948.

The production of the Handbook of South American Indians Vol 3 (1936-1948) by Priscila Faulhaber.

The Handbook of South American Indians is a monographic series of edited scholarly and reference volumes in ethnographic studies, published by the Smithsonian Institution between 1940 and 1947.[1] In 1932, Baron Erland Nordenskiöld agreed to edit the series for the National Research Council Division of Anthropology and Psychology; however, he died that year. The Smithsonian Institution agreed to sponsor the series but adequate funds were not approved by US Congress until 1940. Julian Steward edited the series. Ultimately, over a hundred scholars from Latin America, the United States, and Europe contributed and provided advice for the series.[1] This six-volume series, with an additional index volume, documents information about Indigenous peoples of South America, including cultural and physical aspects of the people, language family, history, and prehistory. This is a reference work for historians, anthropologists, other scholars, and the general reader. The series utilizes noted authorities for each topic. The set is illustrated, indexed, and has extensive bibliographies.

The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 2 – The Andean Civilizations

Steward, Julian H., The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 2 – The Andean Civilizations, Washington: Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology, 1946.

The Purpose of the Handbook…, as originally conceived by the National Research Council…

The Handbook of South American Indians is a monographic series of edited scholarly and reference volumes in ethnographic studies, published by the Smithsonian Institution between 1940 and 1947.[1] In 1932, Baron Erland Nordenskiöld agreed to edit the series for the National Research Council Division of Anthropology and Psychology; however, he died that year. The Smithsonian Institution agreed to sponsor the series but adequate funds were not approved by US Congress until 1940. Julian Steward edited the series. Ultimately, over a hundred scholars from Latin America, the United States, and Europe contributed and provided advice for the series.[1] This six-volume series, with an additional index volume, documents information about Indigenous peoples of South America, including cultural and physical aspects of the people, language family, history, and prehistory. This is a reference work for historians, anthropologists, other scholars, and the general reader. The series utilizes noted authorities for each topic. The set is illustrated, indexed, and has extensive bibliographies.

The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 1 – The Marginal Tribes

Steward, Julian H., The Handbook of South American Indians, Vol 1 – The Marginal Tribes, Washington: Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology, 1946.

Sections:

1. Indians of Southern South America
2. Indians of the Gran Chaco
3. The Indians of Eastern Brazil.


The Handbook of South American Indians is a monographic series of edited scholarly and reference volumes in ethnographic studies, published by the Smithsonian Institution between 1940 and 1947.[1] In 1932, Baron Erland Nordenskiöld agreed to edit the series for the National Research Council Division of Anthropology and Psychology; however, he died that year. The Smithsonian Institution agreed to sponsor the series but adequate funds were not approved by US Congress until 1940. Julian Steward edited the series. Ultimately, over a hundred scholars from Latin America, the United States, and Europe contributed and provided advice for the series.[1] This six-volume series, with an additional index volume, documents information about Indigenous peoples of South America, including cultural and physical aspects of the people, language family, history, and prehistory. This is a reference work for historians, anthropologists, other scholars, and the general reader. The series utilizes noted authorities for each topic. The set is illustrated, indexed, and has extensive bibliographies.